Otaki Library, November 2015

R_KCDC-Library-bannerKia ora from the Otaki Public Library – Te Wharepukapuka o Otaki

XS15_LIB_Little_Dribbling.jpgThe Road to Little Dribbling

Bill Bryson

To mark the twentieth anniversary of that modern classic, Notes from a Small Country, Bill Bryson makes a brand-new journey round Britain to see what has changed. Following (but not too closely) a route he dubs the Bryson Line, from Bognor Regis to Cape Wrath, by way of places that many people never get to at all, Bryson sets out to rediscover the wondrously beautiful, magnificently eccentric, endearingly unique country that he thought he knew but doesn’t altogether recognize any more. Yet, despite Britain’s occasional failings and more or less eternal bewilderments, Bill Bryson is still pleased to call Britain home. And not just because of the cream teas, a noble history, and an extra day off at Christmas. Once again, with his matchless homing instinct for the funniest and quirkiest, his unerring eye for the idiotic, the endearing, the ridiculous and the scandalous, Bryson gives an acute and perceptive insight into all that is best and worst about Britain today.

XS15_LIB_Hostage.jpgHostage

Kristina Ohlsson

Shortly after a crowded New York-bound flight takes off from Stockholm, a bomb threat is found on board. Anonymous hijackers demand that the Swedish government revoke its decision to deport a Moroccan man. If their demands are not met, the plane will explode if it attempts to land. The US and Swedish governments must choose between negotiating with terrorists in order to save the four hundred passengers held hostage at thirty thousand feet, or to stand their ground and pursue the deportation of a possibly innocent man. Fredrika Bergman returns to the police force to act as a liaison between Police Superintendent Alex Recht, and the abrasive Eden Lundell, agent with the Security Service’s counter-terrorism unit. But they soon realize that the plot behind the hijacking is far more complex than anyone initially thought. As the hours pass, the team are running out of options, and the plane is running out of fuel…

XS15_LIB_Mountain_Rescue.jpgMountain Rescue: Epic Tales of Search and Rescue in High-Country New Zealand

Phillip Melchior

Ill-equipped, underprepared, suffering from summit fever or just plain unlucky, a handful of climbers every year fall victim to New Zealand’s Southern Alps. Most will be able to look back, learn from their experiences, and think the have had a fortunate escape. Others won’t be so lucky. This book tells the stories behind some of New Zealand’s most dramatic search and rescue operations in the Southern Alps and their foothills. Some are triumphs, others tragedies, but all reveal the skill and heroism of our volunteers — the ones who show up when good days in the mountains go horribly wrong.

XS15_LIB_Prison_Book_CLub.jpgThe Prison Book Club

Ann Walmsley

After Ann Walmsley was mugged near her house in Hampstead, she found she was unable to walk alone down the street. In Canada a few years later, when her friend Carol asked her to participate in a bold new venture in a men’s medium security prison, Ann had to weigh her curiosity and desire to be of service with her anxiety and fear. But she signed up and for eighteen months went to a remote building a few hours outside of Toronto, meeting a group of heavily tattooed book club members without the presence of guards or security cameras. A prison book club proved to be a place to share ideas, learn about each other, and regain humanity. Having been judged themselves, the prisoners were quick to make judgments about the books they read. Their discussions revealed glimpses of their own struggles that were both devastating and comic. From The Grapes of Wrath to The Cellist of Sarajevo, and Outliers to Infidel, the book discussions became a springboard for frank conversations about loss, anger, redemption, heroism and loneliness.